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Manfred

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Manfred
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  • The copyright notice only stopped being a requirement in 1989, the year the USA signed the Bern treaty. That's why I said "prior to 1989". The booklets we are talking about were all published before that year, weren't they?
  • I am no lawyer either, but IMHO it is possible that it's perfectly legal to reuse Cockrill's works in the United States. In the US only US laws apply, not UK laws, and according to US law a copyright notice was required in publications prior to 1989…
  • Mik, I was wondering the same thing. I believe Bryant wants to distinguish between an overprint stating the new value and one indicating an addition to the existing value. However, I don't know of any stamps where the overprint would state an added…
  • The postage dues definitely would have qualified as the first SS - had they been issued. Personally, I think the term souvenir sheet is the most honest one, because it gets right to the point of what this is about: although valid for franking, the m…
  • I don't know ... to me, differentiating between souvenir sheets, mini- or miniature sheets, presentation sheets or even "deluxe sheet(let)s" seems like hair-splitting. The German Michel-Katalog refers to all stamps issued in very small sheets (= she…
  • Travis, in issued colors, these were marketed as "deluxe sheetlets", at least later by Format. I don't know if they were ever sold over the counter in Liberia, but they were valid for franking, sometimes used to create FDCs, like the one shown with…
  • @Bryant: Actually, sets in b/w and (different!) colors exist on both types of paper, so there are four sets. My red 2c proof on India paper shows part of the papermaker's watermark reading “Excels”. Excelsior paper was a brand of the London-based p…
  • Another resource worth plundering is the digital archive of The Collectors Club Philatelist: https://www.collectorsclub.org/ccp/search-the-collectors-club-philatelist/ Not that many articles on Liberia, and some of them will look familiar because th…
  • Albert, the "prices realized" you sent out made me take another look at the Lockard sale. Check out lot #60: #77 Var., 1901-02 32c Greenish blue Official handstamped "Ordinary", wonderfully fresh and bright, bold "Monrovia, Liberia/Oct, 1902" datest…
    in #90 ? Comment by Manfred September 2020
  • Oranges were probably not farmed for export, but definitely for the local market. The fruit produced in the coast regions consists of coconuts, pineapples, oranges, limes, mangoes, papaws. Avocado pears, "sour sop," bananas, and plantains. Johnston…
  • There is nothing about this 'O S' imprint that would make me think it is handstamped. It looks exactly like the 'O S' overprint on #O22. It has the right font and is at the right position. It may not be listed by any of the major catalogs, but the 1…
    in #90 ? Comment by Manfred September 2020
  • https://www.philbansner.com/philatelic-literature.htm Just search for the title PLATING THE 1880 ISSUES
  • 1) I rarely use von Saleski's catalog, and I wasn't aware of his "charitable organizations" story. I wonder if he had first hand knowledge of this or if he had read it somewhere. His catalog contains material he had only heard about but never seen h…
  • They knew what they were buying was not the real thing. This was definitely true for collectors who bought direct from Spiro, Scott and Fournier, who sold their copies as "imitations" or "facsimiles". Others could be added to this list, at least fo…
  • If it looks like a forgery - it is! If it doesn't look like a forgery - its genuine! That pretty much sums it up!
  • I don't see any fakes here (except for those 5-bar postmarks). All forgeries of this issue are, in fact, obvious - including Fournier's facsimiles (because he reused the clichés he created for the 6c and 24c). Manfred.
  • The flaw seamlessly continues from the vignette onto the frame. Therefore, it must have to do with the paper, e.g. debris.
  • The stamp was indeed issued during the second civil war, but the exact date is unclear. Michel says March 1, 2003, but at least one cover from 2001 exists.
  • I haven't seen it either. It is listed by Cockrill, though (booklet 9, page 32).
  • I have one. Don't know why I never scanned it. I am still looking for the same variety of the official stamp, though.
  • The whole set of official "1921" BPO specimens incl. Bryant's copies is shown on my website. Marty sent me the scans in September 2012 before he sold them.
  • I have one copy. Manfred.
  • Regarding the 8c rate, I just found a note in the Dec. 1913 issue of The London Philatelist, vol. 22, no. 264, p. 298: LIBERIA. — Mr. H. L. Hayman sends us the 3 c. stamp of 1897, Gibbons' Type 33, with the value obliterated with a solid five-pointe…
  • These are from a series of photo proofs and essays signed by the designer of this issue, John Webb. There were a total of 30 complete sets (of eight? - not sure now), but most sets have been split up and sold as singles.
  • Sounds like "CLEAR ADDRESSING SPEEDS YOUR MAIL". It is listed on my postmark page as CPm2.